Tuesday, August 7, 2012

Placers, Paystreaks, and Pockets (Part 2)

 (Depending on the location, decent placer gold like this can be found in pockets and paystreaks.)

Pocket Gold

In a general sense, it could be said that placer gold pockets are a form of paystreak. However, I don't necessarily subscribe to that theory and here's why:

First, paystreaks tend to extend either vertically or laterally for some distance and can be composed of multiple layers. Most pocket gold deposits tend to be isolated or localized in terms of deposition, with little lateral or vertical "movement" or layering. This is a somewhat simplistic comparison, but I think it gives you the basic idea.

Pockets Can be Big or Small

At times pockets can be very rich (multi-ounce) with lots of flakes, coarse gold, and small to medium-sized nuggets or they can hold as little as a gram or two of fines and small flakes. Pockets can be found in both wet and dry placer locations and if you hit one, you'll know it.

Gold Pans
Gold Panning Kits
Mining Equipment

Is there a spot-on method or technique for finding pockets? Not really, but having a seasoned and experienced view in terms of gold deposition physics is a definite asset in finding them.

Bear in Mind

Most of the pockets I've found in wet (running stream) environments tended to rest behind or under larger obstructions, in bedrock cracks and crevices, or resting atop or cemented into clay layers. In dry placers, most of the pockets I've come across were again, lodged behind or under obstructions, resting on false or real bedrock, or (and here's the kicker) were spread haphazardly in isolated instances in bench or terrace gravels.

 (Knowledge of stream hydrology and deposition physics is fundamental to finding paystreaks and pockets.)

Theoretically, there's no limit to the amount or quality of placer gold you may find in a really nice pocket, but in my own experience most were under a troy ounce. Let me pass this tip along to you one more time here:

Pockets tend to form or concentrate in a manner that is closely associated with solid deposition physics.  

That's it for this round. I want to thank all of you out there for your loyalty, appreciation, and support.

Good luck out there!

If you liked this post, you may want to read: "Bisbee Placer Gold"

(c)  Jim Rocha (J.R.)  2012

Questions? E-mail me at jr872vt90@yahoo.com

7 comments:

  1. Jim, I don't know what to say, except "Good"!!! Don't let the bastards drag you down. Great to see ya back in the saddle. Gary

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    1. Hell Gary...I'm as hard-headed as they come once my mind and attitude clear. Too many of you good people out there to say goodbye to...plus, I really do love all things mining and writing about what I know and have learned. Best, J.R.

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    2. Hell Gary...I'm as hard-headed as they come once my mind and attitude clear. Too many of you good people out there to say goodbye to...plus, I really do love all things mining and writing about what I know and have learned. Best, J.R.

      Delete
  2. Welcome back Jim!! I would have missed you my friend. Stan

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  3. Thanks Stan! Despite the drama, all I want to do is make this blog even better and more informative....and to those who'd love to see me close up shop...tough S**T! Best to you. J.R.

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  4. first time on your site and like what I read. Just got back from a long panning expedition in colo. and am resupplying to head out again. I am looking for placer gold spots and will take a sluice along this time, any info on paying placer states or where to head to this time would be great.
    thanx,
    Vance

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    1. Thanks Vance. I have to say your query is a bit vague... you are looking for placer gold spots where? What states? There is placer gold spread throughout much of the West and Southwest but if you're speaking of where good gold values can be recovered in the U.S., your best bet by far is Alaska. E-mail me if you have more specific questions. Best, J.R.

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