Monday, September 19, 2011

A Second Look at Canada’s Yukon: Great Potential for Small-Scale Miners (Part 2)

 (Yukon River.)

Here is my second post in this series on gold in the Yukon Territory and the potential for small-scale miners in that region.

More on Un-Glaciated Placer Areas

More recent un-glaciated placer gold deposits can be found in the Yukon in the drainages of the Yukon, North Ladue, and Stewart Rivers. Most of the gold associated with these deposits is typically found in:

1. Old, abandoned stream channels.
2. “Oxbow” type bends in existing streambeds.
3. High-level terraces.
4. Tributary or “feeder” creeks and streams into the Yukon, North Ladue, and Stewart Rivers.
5. Valley bottoms.

Placer Gold in Glaciated Areas

In the Yukon’s glaciated areas, especially those associated with pre-Reid glacial episodes or events, placer gold can be found in valley bottoms underneath layers of glacial drift. At the same time, glaciated placers like this can be topped or covered by more recent un-glaciated gold placers that provide a “one-two punch” of gold-bearing gravels for those Canadian prospectors and miners adept at recognizing pertinent geological “signposts.”

Gold Pans
Gold Panning Kits
Mining Equipment

Areas of interest concerning the above include all the drainages in the Clear Creek area, the South McQuesten River valley, and any creeks or streams draining the Ruby Range on the east side of Kluane lake. Other prospective placers may be found in drainages surrounding the old Livingstone placer area.

Economically Feasible

Many of the glaciated and un-glaciated deposits in the Yukon remain economically feasible in terms of potential. Granted, some of these placer gold deposits will require an investment of more time, money, and equipment than many small-scale miners are capable of, but by the same token…there are many smaller or less extensive placers that could fit the bill quite nicely for those miners operating on a budget, or only intermittently.

 (Newspaper headlines from the days of the Klondike gold rush.)

There’s more to come on Yukon gold potential, so keep coming back. Good luck to one and all, including my Canadian mining friends.

If you liked this post, you may want to read: “More on Gold Prospecting”

© Jim Rocha (J.R.) 2011

Questions? E-mail me at mailto:jr872vt90@yahoo.com


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