Thursday, June 3, 2010

Gold Detector Reviews: Garret's "Infinium LS" (Part 1)


(Garrett's "Infinium LS.")


(DISCLAIMER: I have no vested interest in any of the machines or brands listed in this post nor am I receiving any compensation for recommending them. J.R.)

Top Level or “Professional” Detectors

Garrett "Infinium LS"

The Garrett "Infinium LS" is one of the new breed of higher-end ($1065.00-$1250.00) metal detectors that employ a pulse induction (PI) operating technology. Most professional nugget hunters today are in agreement that PI is vastly superior to most other operating systems (i.e., VLF/TR, VHF, etc.) especially when it comes to handling highly mineralized or "hot" ground. Additionally, PI technology is very stable and extremely versatile when it comes to overall performance.

"Land or Sea"

Unlike many of its PI counterparts, the Garrett "Infinium LS" is completely submersible (yes, including the control housing). In fact, the "LS" stands for "land or sea." Because of this fact Garrett likes to proclaim that the "Infinium LS will change the way you hunt for treasure on the land, in the water, and everywhere in between!"

Metal Detectors

This may or may not be completely true, but what is apparent is the obvious advantage that a completely submersible nugget-hunting machine has. Although most nugget hunting is done "dry" (old tailings, dry placers, Aussie Outback, etc.) many bedrock gold "snipers" I know who work the California Motherlode's rivers, creeks, and streams could put the "Infinium LS" to good use. In my view this aspect of the "Infinium LS" opens up new possibiilites for nugget hunters.

There are also obvious advantages to a "land or sea" machine like Garrett's for treasure hunters who are not strictly focused on gold nugget recovery alone. If you are into scuba diving or underwater salvage the "Infinium LS" can prove a real asset, just as it can for those you interested in locating buried caches or troves on dry land.

Advanced Pulse Induction (API) Technology

In its promotional materials Garrett makes the point that the "Infinium LS" employs a "souped up" version of PI technology the company calls Advanced Pulse Induction (API). This API operating technology combined with a specialized search coil enables the "Infinium LS" to find very small nuggets as well as very thin flakes or other pieces of gold with only slight mass to them.

In other treasure hunting venues Garrett's API is effective in both "all metal" and discrimination modes. Unlike the "old days" when I first started swinging a detector and machines would lose additional depth as more discrimination was applied, the "Infinium LS" has little resultant depth loss in discrimination mode. This can be a tremendous asset in coin hunting as well as a potential benefit in certain nugget hunting situations.

(Note: By the way, my first metal detector was a Garrett that used beat frequency oscillator or BFO circuitry. The BFO employed a rapid or slow beat response to good or bad targets and a simple needle meter indicator. You really had to learn to "listen" to targets with a BFO before you began digging...no fancy graphic displays to show you what was what underfoot. Most of you out there probably have never heard of BFO machines so this should show you how far back on the Owl Hoot Trail I go! J.R.)

Adjustable Frequency Option

Another very nice aspect of the "Infinium LS" is its adjustable frequency option. This is really something you won't see on most gold detectors since they are designed to operate on one frequency and one frequency alone. This frequency adjustment range (from low to ultra high) allows you to choose and set up the optimum frequency for the specific type of hunting you are performing.

Wolverine Boots
Dickies Work Clothes

Anyhoo, I'll have more "Infinium LS" features and specifications for you in the immediate future. There are just too many to squeeze into a solitary post.

So until then take good care out there.

If you liked this post, you may want to read: "Small-Scale and Recreational Mining 'State of the Union' (Part 3)"

(c) J.R. 2010

Questions? E-mail me at jr872vt90@yahoo.com

No comments:

Post a Comment